Why some peoples are more unemployed than others
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Why some peoples are more unemployed than others

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Published by Verso in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Unemployment.,
  • Economic policy.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementGöran Therborn.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD5707.5 .T53x 1986
The Physical Object
Pagination181 p. ;
Number of Pages181
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2349740M
ISBN 100860911098, 0860918173
LC Control Number86673385

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Additional Physical Format: Online version: Therborn, Göran, Why some peoples are more unemployed than others. London: Verso, (OCoLC)   > Why are unemployed people not getting jobs? There are several issues that face people not currently employed finding work. * Employed candidates are more attractive. This has always been true, and will remain so for the foreseeable future, in m.   And have these questions become particularly pressing and not in the least confined to other peoples, times, and places?Making selective and critical use of the thought of such important figures as Sigmund Freud, Jacques Derrida, and Mikhail Bakhtin, in Understanding Others Dominick LaCapra investigates a series of crucial topics from the. This is a classic in the study of social movements. The authors were scholar activists in the 's and 's who looked at the ways poor people's movements in the 's and 's were able to make signficant gains, but then also lost momentum and saw some /5.

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